TS2 SPACE in the fight against coronavirus in Europe

Due to the wide range of satellite telecommunications services provided for entities of strategic importance to Poland, TS2 SPACE has been included in an official list of key entities vital to the operation of critical state infrastructure. The list is maintained by the Government Centre for Security and includes companies that are not part of the critical infrastructure, but are vital to ensuring continuity of its operation. This is of particular importance in supporting activities related to the prevention, counteraction and eradication of COVID-19, other infectious diseases and crisis situations…

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Biology 

SpaceX Dragon goes back to earth after conveying supplies of NASA to Space Station

The SpaceX Dragon space ship goes back to earth on 7 January after a journey of seven months in delivering supplies of NASA to the International Space Center.  Space travelers on space station released Dragon CRS-19 space ship into space with the robotic arm of the outpost, wishing space journey masses to a space ship that conveyed over 5,700 lbs. (2,585kilograms) of NASA’s supplies last month. The dragon left the station at around 5:05 a.m. EST (1005 GMT) and went down in the Pacific Ocean at around 10:41 a.m. EST…

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Biology 

New Jersey to offer the best incentives to those yearning to purchase a car

New Jersey could give car owners a huge allowance on a purchase or contract and add to the existing numbers of charging points if it observes a significant increase in the number of electric vehicles using indigenous roads under a bill gaining motion.  The measure is viewed as a foundation stone on the efforts of reducing air contamination, which constitutes of Green House gases in a country that receives failing ratings for haze. Doug O’Malley, who is the director of the activism group of Environment New Jersey, said that if…

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Brandy new electric vehicles on the way

In case you had some persistent thought, place them to the side since electrification has come to cars, SUVs, and pickup HGVs. The choice for new electric vehicles is increasing in numbers as the vehicles come in various types. A fuss of end year broadcasts reveals a need to make new cars present in the car manufacturers as they aim to expand and fill the market with the new electric vehicles. As cars that are more electric get to the market, customers will have a better opportunity to choose that…

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Biology 

ISRO to lift off Communication Satellite GSAT-30 on 17 January 

India will lift off a massive satellite known as GSAT-30 this January on the seventeenth. The lift-off will take place at Kourou Space Center in French Guiana. Onboard, it will have Ariane-5 rocket of the European Space Agency (Ariane Space).  The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) chairperson stated that the lift-off GSAT-30 from Kouru would be the first satellite of the agency to launch this year. The satellite will provide a connection to communicate to help run the country and non-governmental service givers.  In the meantime, Sivan has made a…

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Biology 

How satellites boost the connectivity Internet of Things 

As the demand for devices linked across the earth is on the rise, communications through satellites are making sure that the connectivity is on a larger scale The most crucial trend in the Internet of Things will be full of consumption following many years of thinking about what the Internet of Things can achieve. One of the main reasons behind this pressure is the increase in the global; connectivity since there are developments taking place in communication. It has been a big challenge to use satellites in the olden days,…

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Biology 

The Winners of Nobel Prize Talk Universal Secrets with Astronauts in Space

There was specific robust hero-worshipping happening on between Earth and space lately.  December 6, on the Sweden ground, three Nobel Prize laureates congregated to chat about the universe with the two Expedition 61 astronauts orbiting unevenly 250 miles equivalent to 400 kilometers above the Earth’s surface: Jessica Meir of NASA and Luca Parmitano of Italy on the International Space Station.  Hot on the subject list. What the life on the moon would look like and how the work of the Nobel Price led to life on the space station on…

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Other 

Greenlandic civilisations disappeared in the 15th century due to over-hunting of walruses.

Founded following the expulsion of Erik the Red from Iceland in 985 AD, the Norse colonies of Greenland prospered for centuries but then disappeared, almost suddenly, around 1400. Today only several ruins and remnants of what was once a relatively large community trading with other Viking and continental European societies of the time remain. According to a new study, conducted by James H. Barrett, a researcher at the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, the end of these communities was decreed by the exploitation of local walrus populations,…

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Psychology 

Grandparents taking care of grandchildren are less subject to loneliness and social isolation

This is also confirmed by a new study that appeared in BMJ Open: grandparents who take care of their grandchildren are characterised by a lower risk of experiencing loneliness and social isolation in general. It is precisely those grandparents who are generally part of larger social networks, all the more so if the people who make up these networks are important to them, they are therefore less likely to feel lonely. The researchers analyzed the responses of 3849 people to a survey in which several German adults between 40 and…

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Medicine and health 

Owning a dog is good for mental health according to a new study

The company of a dog makes us feel good mentally according to a new study that appeared in the Journal of Public Health. The study analyzed the effects of a dog’s company on mental health over time, unlike previous studies that focused mostly on beneficial effects on physical health. Researchers analyzed the effects of a dog’s ownership on mental health over a two-year period, covering 1023 participants from Perth, Western Australia. The data was mostly collected from surveys and related to factors such as weekly minutes of walking with the…

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Space and astronomy 

China launches Sudan’s first satellite

This is the first satellite launched from Sudan that was put into orbit by China, according to an article in the AFP. The launch was carried out on Sunday by the Shanxi Province, in China, and the news was also spread by General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, head of the Southern Sovereign Council, during a meeting held in Khartoum. The satellite, called Sudan Remote Sensing Satellite (SRSS-1), will be used for projects related to aspatial technology, data acquisition, the discovery of new natural resources and for the military needs of the…

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Medicine and health 

The clitoris also has reproductive functions according to a new study

The clitoris is important for reproduction and is therefore not a mere organ dedicated to stimulation and achieving orgasm. This is what a new study in Clinical Anatomy claims, according to which clitoral stimulation activates certain processes in the brain which in turn lead to a combination of various changes in the female reproductive tract. These changes mean that the same reproductive tract is ready to receive and process sperm in order to obtain more efficient and likely fertilization of the place. These changes include improved vaginal blood flow, increased…

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Applied Sciences 

75 gigabytes of data stored in glass sheets the size of a coaster

In order to try to preserve and generally preserve more efficiently all its content, television and film, Warner Bros. is working with Microsoft in the context of what can be considered as a new concept in terms of digital data storage. Called Project Silica, Microsoft’s research sector project uses laser optics and artificial intelligence to store digital data in thin strips of quartz glass. During the first experiments, scientists managed to store the entire 1978 Superman film in a square piece of glass 7.5 cm per side and only 2…

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Applied Sciences 

Wireless charging for electric vehicles: new step towards full charging in 20 minutes

A new step forward has been taken by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding wireless charging, particularly of electric vehicles. The researchers have in fact created new methods for wireless charging that, as defined in the same press release that presents the study, could double the power density of classic systems. For the same power, for example, the system could be much lighter than today’s technologies. The new method of wireless charging involves the use of two coils, one applied under the vehicle and the other at street…

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Other 

70 mile wall found in Iran: it could date back to 2400 years ago

A wall about 70 miles long has been found in western Iran, in the county of Sar Pol-e Zahab. According to the archaeologists who are studying it, this stone wall was built between the fourth century BC and the sixth century AD, a fairly large fork indicating that this new “find” will still have to be studied properly. It is a wall of about one million cubic meters made of stone, a work that most likely required a huge workforce in addition to a long time and a huge amount…

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Other 

Ancient Egyptian cat mummy contains remains of three other cats

The strange discovery of a 2500-year-old cat mummy containing the partial remains of three other cats was made by a group of researchers when they analyzed the mummy of an Egyptian cat belonging to a collection located in the Museum of Fine Arts in Rennes, France. The mummies of cats are certainly not new: these felines were considered sacred animals and it is believed that the first cats, evolutionistically speaking, were born in the area of the Fertile Crescent about 10,000 years ago when the first Egyptian populations began to…

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Medicine and health 

Scientists discover that antibiotics extend the survival of mice with pediatric brain tumors

A group of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center found that a version of the drug DON, an antibiotic isolated for the first time more than sixty years ago from soil bacteria, can extend the survival of mice suffering from lethal pediatric brain tumors, those marked by a high expression of a cancerous gene called MYC. The results have been published in two studies on Clinical Cancer Research and Translational Oncology. DON was isolated from soil bacteria in Peru. Because it was able to block glutamine, it immediately…

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Medicine and health 

Headache and backache strongly linked according to new study

A new study shows the correlation between back and headaches. The results of the study, published in the Journal of Headache and Pain, state that people with persistent backache or persistent headaches are twice as likely to suffer from both disorders. Conducted by researchers at the University of Warwick, the study therefore suggests possible treatments that could include both conditions. The researchers analyzed the data of 460,195 people and noted an association between persistent back pain and persistent headache and the same association became stronger for those people with migraines.…

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Medicine and health 

Dogs of overweight owners are at greater risk of becoming obese

Overweight dog owners are more at risk of having overweight dogs: this is the result of the special research conducted by the University of Copenhagen. According to the research communiqué, the risk is “considerably higher” than for owners with a normal weight. The researchers analyzed the data of 268 adult dogs of which 20% were overweight or obese. According to the same researchers, the correlation is explained by the way in which dog owners manage the diets of animals. Basically, while normal dog owners only use the treats for training…

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Paleontology 

Coral reefs and squat lobsters proliferated 150 million years ago

Coral reefs and several aquatic animals were at the height of their diversity some 150 million years ago, before dinosaurs began to rule the world. This is claimed by a new study in the Journal of the Linnean Society conducted by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley. The study describes extensive coral reefs that existed during the Jurassic in the Tethys Sea, a shallow sea that covered the area that now belongs to Central Europe and that stretched from the region of today’s Spain to Asia. This reef…

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Medicine and health 

New mechanism discovered with which body produces less insulin

A mechanism never discovered that regulates the release of insulin in the body has been discovered by a group of researchers at the University of Uppsala. The inefficiency or interruption of the release of insulin in the body is at the root of type 2 diabetes from which about 400 million people worldwide suffer. Insulin is a hormone whose task is to lower blood glucose levels and is released by the beta cells of the pancreas. Usually, the level of insulin production is lowered by the inability of the granules…

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Environment 

7% of fishing nets are lost at sea according to a study

A new study has focused on the amount of fishing gear that was abandoned or lost in the sea. These objects account for a large proportion of all global marine pollution. To conduct the study, Kelsey Richardson, a student of the CSIRO Marine Debris Team, used the data contained in 68 studies published between 1975 and 2017. The researchers found that there are three main factors that lead to the loss of fishing gear at sea: bad weather, the locking of the gear at the bottom of the sea and…

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Medicine and health 

Possible target enzyme for Alzheimer’s discovered by researchers

A new possible pharmacological target to combat Alzheimer’s disease has been discovered by a group of researchers from the Queensland Brain Institute. The researchers found that the enzyme dPI3K is responsible for the production of a particular toxic peptide that accumulates in the plaques of the brains of Alzheimer’s patients “causing chaos,” as specified by Ramón Martínez-Mármol who conducted the study with Frédéric A. Meunier. In addition, this same enzyme produces an important signaling protein involved in the inflammation. The researchers carried out experiments on mice with Alzheimer’s disease: by…

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Psychology 

Childhood traumas can slow brain growth during adolescence

A difficult childhood or traumas that occurred at an early age can then cause significant psychological problems that can continue into adulthood. A new study, conducted by researchers from the School of Medicine at Washington University, shows, however, that adverse childhood experiences, such as abandonment or abuse, can even change the structure of the brain. To be precise, difficult childhood experiences can cause a slowdown in the growth of certain areas of the brain during adolescence. The data used by the researchers are part of a 15-year study of 211…

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Other 

Archaeologists find evidence of the ancient biblical kingdom of Edom in Israel and Jordan

In Genesis 36:31 of the Bible is described an Edomite kingdom that would have lived at the beginning of the fifth century BC: “the kings who reigned in the land of Edom, before a king of the Israelites reigned.” However, there are different conflicting interpretations of this passage. A new study, published in PLOS ONE and conducted by researchers from the University of Tel Aviv, seems to show, however, that this kingdom flourished in the desert of Arava, a region now belonging to Israel and Jordan, between the twelfth and…

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Geology 

Huge rock masses found under the earth’s mantle before the liquid nucleus

A geologist has indirectly analyzed the continental regions made of rocks between the mantle and the Earth’s core, regions that have been isolated since the origin of the Earth and that collision event that, it is thought, created the Moon about 4.5 billion years ago. These layers would still be almost intact and would represent the last rocky bulwark before the molten core and the solid metal core in the center of the Earth. This is what the study that appeared in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems conducted by Curtis Williams, a…

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Applied Sciences 

Implantable device in the brain allows visual perception to blind people

A brain implant that allows people who have lost their sight to benefit from some sort of new vision system was developed by scientists at the University of California in Los Angeles. The implant has already been tested on a person, Jason Esterhuizen, who became blind seven years ago following a car accident. The experimental device was implanted in his brain and, while it does not provide a true view of the reality surrounding the patient, it does improve the patient’s ability to navigate the environment and do things that,…

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Paleontology 

Why did the Neanderthals become extinct? Here is a new study that may have the answer

One of the greatest mysteries of anthropology may have been solved by a group of researchers at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University: why have Neanderthal men died out? Was it a specific virus that only affected these hominids? Was there a catastrophic event? The team of anthropologists, led by Samuel Márquez, in a study published in the Anatomical Record suggests that the Neanderthals could have been extinguished by a childhood disease caused by a chronic infection in the ear. The researchers claim to have reconstructed, for the first time, the…

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Other 

More than 3 billion birds have disappeared in North America alone since 1970

More than 3 billion birds have disappeared in North America alone since 1970, according to a study by Ken Rosenberg, an animal conservation scientist at Cornell University’s ornithological laboratory, who published his own study, together with his colleagues, on Science. This is 30% of the total and many of the species would have been placed in the category of animals in danger of extinction. Most of the species that have disappeared are sparrows and blackbirds. These numbers and data show how many different species of birds can run into extinction,…

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Biology 

New method to kill bacteria resistant to antibiotics developed by Japanese scientists

A group of researchers at the University of Nagoya has come up with a new method of killing the most resistant pathogenic bacteria. The researchers developed a method using artificial blood proteins. Artificial blood proteins can be used as a “Trojan horse” to selectively transport antimicrobial agents to targeted bacteria. This allows for specific and more effective sterilization. This technique, tested with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can often be found in hospitals and that has become resistant to antibiotics, has proven to be 99.9% effective but, as…

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